Archive for March, 2012

The Massachusetts Pirate Party Discusses Kopimism

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Fellow Kopimists,

We are thrilled to see that Kopimism was discussed recently at the 2012 Massachusetts Pirate Party Conference! The great presentation, courageously delivered by Lauren Pespisa, can be found here.

If you would like more information on the Massachusetts Pirate Party, feel free to visit their website at www.masspirates.org

To the troll in the video who attempted several times to attack Kopimism: sir, you should not bring a legal argument to a religion fight. Expecting any religion to provide a logic-based mandate for every single action that one might take is absurd and offensive. It insults the basic moral fiber of Kopimists and all of humanity to outright demand a total moral code of conduct from anyone purporting to have a new perspective on issues of our time. Are we nothing but slaves to our omnipotent Gods? This kind of expectation is typical of someone living in the shadow of Judeo-Christian dogma embedded in an overly-authoritarian governance structure.

Copying and disseminating information is ethically right. Copymixing is sacred and a sign of respect. These ideas do not deal in any way with compensation of any kind for the transfer of information, nor do they place mandates on Kopimists. People decide for themselves where they draw the lines. People decide what they release and what they choose to keep private. Please, try listening before you speak. Who knows… you might end up sharing a bit in the end!

Sharing my data

every day

every way,

AdVATAR

The Massachusetts Pirate Party Discusses Kopimism
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Eircom…Worst ISP in the World

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Another regurgitated article from TorrentFreak.com -=-

Having originally resisted the notion that it should stop its subscribers sharing copyright works, in a little under 4 years Ireland’s ISP Eircom has come completely about-face. Not only did it come to a private agreement with the music industry to implement a 3 strikes-style regime, but now its asking other ISPs to join them in doing so. It’s lonely being this kind of ‘pioneer’, especially when it puts your company at a commercial disadvantage.

In 2008, the Irish Recorded Music Association (IRMA) took legal action against Eircom, Ireland’s largest ISP.

The so-called Big Four labels – EMI, Sony, Universal and Warner – wanted the ISP to install proactive filtering technology aimed at stopping unauthorized file-sharing among Eircom’s customers. Eircom refused, IRMA sued, and the case ended up in court – but not for very long.

At the 11th hour in February 2009 the companies came to an agreement which would see Eircom introduce a graduated response system for dealing with errant subscribers.

However, Eircom needed something in return. The agreement had left Eircom in the unenviable position of being the only ISP in Ireland with an official policy of disconnecting customers on the mere allegations of the music industry.

But the first recording industry target, ISP UPC, refused to play ball and after being sued it eventually won its case.

While the labels did ‘reward’ Eircom’s compliance with the MusicHub service, the product has been labeled lacklaster and when PaidContent asked how many users the service had, Eircom refused to tell them.

So with Eircom now at a commercial disadvantage and no immediate sign that the industry will force any other ISP to implement 3 strikes, the ISP is being left to go it alone. In making the best out of a bad situation it’s now describing what it is doing as an “obligation”.

“Eircom is of the view that these obligations are part of a role that all responsible companies must serve,” Eircom’s consumer managing director Stephen Beynon said.

Eircom insist that they want to respect their customers’ right to privacy but from fighting IRMA in 2008/9, they now believe that other ISPs should do as they have done, and do a deal with the recording group.

“We think that it would be better for everyone if the industry and the rights-holders found a way to tackle this problem. It’s not going to go away. The current situation is not ideal but we could create something that moved the issue forward if we worked together,” Beynon added.

Or in other words, the water’s great, come on in.

Beynon says that Eircom believes it has an obligation to uphold the law when illegal activity is brought to its attention but it’s taking the word of a private P2P tracking company as final and there is no judicial oversight, something that causes controversy in every jurisdiction it’s suggested.

It’s interesting to note that if Eircom had held its ground back in 2008 when it was sued by the labels to proactively filter subscriber upload data, by now it would have heard Europe’s highest court dismiss what they were being asked to do as illegal.

Had they known that in 2009, would they have felt so compelled to do the 3 strikes deal?

Eircom…Worst ISP in the World
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BREINless

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Anti-Piracy Group Shuts Down Pirate Bay Proxies – once again demonstrating a staggering understanding of how the internet works ;)

Hollywood-backed anti-piracy outfit BREIN is trying to stop the massive influx of Pirate Bay proxy sites that circumvent a court-ordered blockade in the Netherlands. The group obtained an injunction against one proxy and has threatened many others with legal action. While BREIN’s efforts appear to have had some effect, the question is for how long.

In January, the Court of The Hague ruled that Ziggo, the largest ISP in the Netherlands, and competitor XS4ALL, must block access to The Pirate Bay.

The ruling was the first to bring broad censorship to the Netherlands, but as always the Internet finds ways to route around such blockades. In the space of a few days hundreds of individuals setup proxy websites that allow customers of the ISPs to continue using The Pirate Bay.

These proxies render the court order useless, which is a thorn in the side of local anti-piracy outfit BREIN. In an attempt to take these proxies offline, BREIN has contacted the owners of these proxy sites, ordering to take down the proxies – or else.

This week the anti-piracy group obtained an injunction from the Court of The Hague which instructs the proxy site tpb.dehomies.nl to shut down. If the site owner continues to offer access to The Pirate Bay he risks a fine of 1000 euros per day.

Armed with the court papers, BREIN also contacted the operators of many other proxy sites including alwaysapirate.org and remastered.nl who quickly took their sites offline and replaced them with a message from the anti-piracy group.

Depiratebay.nl and thepiratebay2.nl were also contacted by BREIN, but these sites remain accessible for now.

The 15-year old operator of the latter site confirmed that he will take the site offline before BREIN’s deadline passes this Friday. While he doesn’t agree with BREIN’s request, he simply doesn’t have the resources to put up a fight in court.

In their letter to the site owners, BREIN threatens legal action against those who continue to keep their proxies online. In many cases, this threat of being sued by a conglomerate of US movie studios is enough to convince proxy owners to fold.

“These sites deliberately offer a service to circumvent a court injunction. If they do not comply, we will hold them liable for damages,” BREIN director Tim Kuik said in a comment to Tweakers.

It will be interesting to see for how long BREIN can continue this cat and mouse game. The proxies targeted so far were all specifically aimed at Dutch visitors and hosted on Dutch servers. Whether it will be as effective against sites hosted elsewhere remains to be seen.

The Pirate Bay team informed TorrentFreak that they are not worried about the fate of their Dutch visitors. They expect that for every proxy that goes offline, new ones will spring up, as is usually the case. There are plenty of free proxy tools available and everyone with a WordPress blog can set one up in a few clicks.

If anything, The Pirate Bay crew believes that BREIN is giving them a helping hand.

“Thanks yet again for the free advertising,” they say.

The Pirate Bay has a point here. All the talk about censorship and blockades only appears to strengthen the notorious torrent site. When there was talk about a UK blockade two weeks ago, local traffic surged. And visitors from Belgium and the Netherlands have massively turned to proxy sites after the torrent site was censored there.

To quote John Gilmore once again: “The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.”

From Torrentfreak.com

BREINless

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Worlds-first-flying-file-sharing-drones-in-action

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Posted on March 21, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a Comment.

Worlds-first-flying-file-sharing-drones-in-action
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How The Copyright Industry Drives A Big Brother Dystopia

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REPUBLISHED FROM TORRENTFREAK.COM

Original by Rick Falkvinge.

Reposted this great piece by Rick F/Torrentfreak

All too often I hear that the copyright industry doesn’t understand the Internet, doesn’t understand the net generation, doesn’t understand how technology has changed. This is not only wrong; it is dangerously wrong. In order to defeat an adversary; you must first come to understand their state of mind, rather than painting them as evil. The copyright industry understands exactly what the Internet is, and that it needs to be destroyed for that industry to stay even the slightest relevant.

Look at the laws being proposed right now. General wiretapping. Mandatory citizen tracking. Excommunication, for Odin’s sake. Sending people into exile. All these laws follow one single common theme: they aim to re-centralize the permission to publish ideas, knowledge, and culture, and punish anybody who circumvents the old gatekeepers’ way beyond proportion.

Having this gatekeeper position – having had this gatekeeper position – teaches somebody what power is, in the worst sense of the word. If you can determine what culture, knowledge, and ideas are available to people – if you are in a position to say yes or no to publishing an idea – then it goes much beyond the power of mere publishing. It puts you in a position to select. It puts you in a position where you get to decide people’s frame of reference. It literally gives you the power to decide what people discuss, feel, and think.

The ability to share ideas, culture, and knowledge without permission or traceability is built into the foundations of the net, just as it was when the Postal Service was first conceived. When we send a letter in the mail, we and we alone determine whether we identify ourselves as sender on the outside of the envelope, on the inside for only the recipient to know, or not at all; further, nobody may open our sealed letters in transit just to check up on what we’re sending.

The Internet mimics this. It is perfectly reasonable that our children have the same rights as our parents did here. But if our children have those same rights, in the environment where they communicate, it makes a small class of industries obsolete. Therefore, this is what the copyright industry tries to destroy.

They are pushing for laws that introduce identifiability, even for historic records. The copyright industry has been one of the strongest proponents of the Data Retention Directive in Europe, which mandates logging of our communications – not its contents, but all information about whom we contacted when and how – for a significant period of time. This is data that used to be absolutely forbidden to store for privacy reasons. The copyright industry has managed to flip that from “forbidden” to “mandatory”.

They are pushing for laws that introduce liability on all levels. A family of four may be sued into oblivion by an industry cartel in a courtroom where presumption of innocence doesn’t exist (a civil proceeding), and they’re pushing for mail carriers to be liable for the contents of the sealed messages they carry. This goes counter to centuries of tradition in postal services, and is a way of enforcing their will extrajudicially – outside the courtroom, where people still have a minimum of rights to defend themselves.

They are pushing for laws that introduce wiretapping of entire populations – and suing for the right to do it before it becomes law. Also, they did it anyway without telling anybody.

They are pushing for laws that send people into exile, cutting off their ability to function in society, if they send the wrong things in sealed letters.

They are pushing for active censorship laws that we haven’t had in well over a century, using child pornography as a battering ram (in a way that directly causes more children to be abused, to boot).

They are pushing for laws that introduce traceability even for the pettiest crimes, which specifically includes sharing of culture (which shouldn’t be a crime in the first place). In some instances, such laws even give the copyright industry stronger rights to violate privacy than that country’s police force.

With these concepts added together, they may finally – finally! – be able to squeeze out our freedom of speech and other fundamental rights, all in order to be able to sustain an unnecessary industry. It also creates a Big Brother nightmare beyond what people could have possibly imagined a decade ago. My undying question is therefore why people waltz along with it instead of smashing these bastards in the face with the nearest chair.

On July 12, for instance, we hear that ISPs in the United States of America will start to serve the copyright industry in the treatment of its own customers, up until and including a possible exile of them as citizens, and most likely scrapping their right to anonymity for the already-going industry game of sue-a-granny.

This is bound to become a textbook example of bad customer relationships in future marketing books: making sure that your customers can be sued into oblivion by entire industry organizations in a rigged game where they’re not even innocent until proven guilty. Seriously, what were the ISPs thinking?

Today, we exercise our fundamental rights – the right to privacy, the right to expression, the right to correspondence, the right to associate, the right to assemble, the right to a free press, and many other rights – through the Internet. Therefore, anonymous and uncensored access to the Internet has become as fundamental a right itself as all the rights we exercise through it.

If this means that a stupid industry that makes thin round pieces of plastic can’t make money anymore, they can go bankrupt for all I care, or start selling mayonnaise instead.

That’s their problem.

How The Copyright Industry Drives A Big Brother Dystopia
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Are local to economize in

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Are local to economize in

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The Mission Rande Kopimistsamfundet
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Stephen Fry talking sense…

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Stephen Fry talking sense…

http://kopimiuk.wordpress.com/2012/03/19/stephen-fry-talking-sense/

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UK Church of Kopimism.

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Bye Bye BPI

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Posted on March 19, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a Comment.

Bye Bye BPI

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Stormy Weather Ahead for Kopimists

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Fellow Kopimists,

As a religion, we do not actively engage in political debate of any kind. When SOPA and ACTA were up for debate, we politely abstained from railing against the injustices brought about by specific pieces of legislation or particular congresspersons. Unfortunately, fellow Kopimists, a very different assault on our ability to worship is happening now. It is much harder to see, and much harder to stop, than any public piece of proposed legislation. It is the willful filtering and censorship of the internet by the very private entities that provide the service, internet service providers (ISPs), in the United States of America.

Hogwash you say?!!? Not in my country you say!!?!! The original CNET News article can be found here.

There is nothing secretive or conspiratorial about it. Several major ISPs that provide internet service for millions of users are going to start automatically monitoring your activities. If they THINK that you are infringing on someone’s copyright, then they’ll notify you. They’ll keep records of all potentially infringing acts. If your internet connection continues to be used for potentially-infringing activities, they will send you more notices, and eventually they may decrease your bandwidth or temporarily suspend your internet service. These are not small, obscure ISPs we’re talking about. These are Comcast, Time Warner, and Verizon.

If a telecom company were to set up monitoring software for telephone lines to identify and record any conversations that they deemed inappropriate, there would be an instantaneous and immediate shift in subscribers. Law-abiding people would flee the service to use other, less-intrusive services simply for the preservation of their privacy. Due to the limited infrastructure and relatively small number of companies running broadband services, for many people that is just not possible. Many users will not have access to an internet connection run by a non-privacy-invading company.

Now, in order to determine if you’re potentially infringing on copyright law, the ISP will need to determine 2 things: what internet locations you are visiting, and what type of data is being exchanged with those websites. This is effectively the same as being forced to wear an ankle bracelet in exchange for being on a piece of private property (like a store or college campus). Once this infrastructure is in place, it is almost laughably easy to abuse it.

As Kopimists, we respect the free flow of information. We want to share our data, and we want others to share theirs. How, then, could someone stop their ISP from determining what websites are being visited? It is called Tor, and it can be found here. Please look into it, and set up a relay if you can. It is important to note that Tor is used for legitimate governmental and private communication EVERY SINGLE DAY by thousands of users. The people who run Tor are amazing individuals, working almost tirelessly to help Kopimists and other like-minded individuals use the internet for creative, life-improving purposes, even when their service providers or governments would force them to do otherwise. Tor has proven particularly useful in opening up internet-based lines of communication in countries where governments actively censor free speech between individuals and the outside world. There are many informational videos about Tor on their website as well as YouTube and perhaps hundreds of interesting articles on a variety of websites. There information is there for you to learn. Please, learn about Tor and support this wonderful system.

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Kopimism In Action

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Hello Kopimists,

I am happy to share a link to a wonderful article with you! It appears that the corporate IT community is doing its part to promote Kopimism principles by refusing to bid on certain government-sponsored censorship projects! The Ars Technica article can be found here.

Copy and seed,

AdVATAR

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